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Friday, 22 December 2017

LogicButton's Best Games of 2017

The last few months have been a bit hectic, hence the haphazard update schedule on the site. Still, I thought it would be good to sign the year off with a look of what I found to be the best games of the year.

I should preface this by saying there were loads of really obvious releases that I haven’t got around to playing yet. Super Mario Odyssey, Assassin’s Creed Origins, Wolfenstein 2...and that’s just the AAA stuff. I’m waiting to get cracking with Danganronpa 3, a series that I’ve already made clear how much I adore.

All in all, one hell of a backlog.

Putting all that aside for the moment, I still played through loads of games this year, many of my thoughts on them documented over the course of (*checks site*), thirty or so posts this year. So, with the obvious caveats in mind, here’s my picks for the best games of 2017.











Minimalist platformers are easy to find post-Ico, and it’s a genre that both indie developers and the AAA crowd are happy to pull from. I’ve just gotten around to playing Breath of the Wild and you can see Fumito Ueda’s style all over it.

Rime is very similar, and it’d be easy to brush it off as just a small budget imitator. Between the gentle pace, the art style and the terrific sound design however, it manages to strike a great balance that works incredibly well.

It can be hard to really “sell” Rime as a concept or game since so much of what it does well has already been done. It’s not particularly challenging, nor all that original, but that doesn’t always matter so long as you get the execution (and emotional pay-off) just right.











Take the bare bones structure of X-COM and Mariofy it. That’s all that happened here, but it worked so darn well. Ubisoft got to show that they can do things that don’t involve farming out ubiquitous sequels for their primary franchises and instead captured how Mario should look and play perfectly, only with a genre that he’s never gotten to grips with yet.

X-COM purists might recoil at how it stomps all over the deep, complex mechanics of Firaxis’ classic, and I’d be lying if parts of Mario + Rabbids aren’t a little shallow, but that’s not enough to prevent it being thoroughly playable from beginning to end.











I am the primary target of Resident Evil 7. I get the level design nods and winks, and the throwbacks to the original game. There’s the obvious references; the shotgun in the dining room, the “mansion” followed by the trip to the other part of the house and a Hunter-style POV shot.

Beyond that though, there’s all the really clever elements of its design. How the Baker family are a retooled and repurposed Nemesis for a new blend of survival horror. In fact, anything to do with the Bakers in Resident Evil 7 is pure gold. How many ways are there to finish that encounter in the garage again?

Despite its critics, Resident Evil 7 isn’t a hashed-together cash-in on fan nostalgia. I mean, nostalgia is baked into how the game works but it’s not specifically the reason that makes it good. Sure, the ending hour or two are pretty poor, but this is the closest that Capcom have come to getting what to do with their most prized series in well over a decade.











Persona 5 is a good game, but it’s an incredible game trapped under some mediocre writing and/or an iffy translation.

The first episode of Persona 5, that has you dealing with both teen suicide and child abuse at a school, sets up exactly what the game is going for. This is a darker, moodier piece than Persona 4. Persona 5 manages to do this without exploiting its topics. Anne and Ryuuji’s twisted relationship with the gym teacher, Futaba’s battle with social anxiety, everything this game deals with it has a genuine warmth and earnestness to it…

...but it had the potential to be so much more. It’s clear that there were reams of extra material that had to be cut due to time constraints. Shido’s role as a corporate snake playing with fascist/hard-right politics is alluded to very weakly rather than dealt with head on. There’s so many great themes that Persona 5 touches on without really going all the way and the fearlessness of the opening ten hours or so sets up expectations that then don’t pay off.

All that aside it really is fantastic and is only a slight disappointment when compared to how good the previous two games were.











I finished this game and my first thought was that I wanted to play more of it. Even good games these days seem anxious about having smaller runtimes. Little Nightmares does its thing however, and then it’s gone.

As with Rime, it’s the execution that works here more than the concept. This is little more than a reworked series of LittleBigPlanet levels, but the atmosphere, story and world design, all of which are conveyed through play, make it way more than the sum of its parts.

Signing Off

So there’s my games of 2017. Like I said, the last few months have been pretty chaotic and have eaten into the amount of time I’ve been able to devote to the site. I’ll be back next year though, and I’m hoping to expand on the typical review format with some pieces focusing on elements of game design and generally expanding the site some more.

Oh, and keep an eye on the YouTube channel, too. I’ve been meaning to put a few more commentaries together over there so be on the look out for those next year.

Have a great Christmas folks, and I’ll be seeing you again in January!

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